Read Goodbye, Things: The New Japanese Minimalism by Fumio Sasaki Online

Goodbye, Things: The New Japanese Minimalism

Fumio Sasaki is not an enlightened minimalism expert; hes just a regular guy who was stressed at work, insecure, and constantly comparing himself to othersuntil one day he decided to change his life by reducing his possessions to the bare minimum. The benefits were instantaneous and absolutely remarkable: without all his stuff, Sasaki finally felt true freedom, peace of mind...

Title : Goodbye, Things: The New Japanese Minimalism
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Number of Pages : 288 pages
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Goodbye, Things: The New Japanese Minimalism Reviews

  • Cheryl

    More memoir than self-help, actually, as so much of what he says does *not* apply universally. And all his 'research' is just reported, there are no notes, bibliography, etc.

    Given that, he's got some great insights here. And each reader will find different bits of value to him or her. And it's short and gracefully written/ translated, so get it from your library if you're interested; give it a go.

    I liked the photos in the beginning of five different 'cases'--different people's examples. Incomple
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  • Emma Sea

    Sasaki's "new Japanese minimalism" relies on a) living in a 24-hour metropolis so you can go out to buy something at 2am at an all-night store if you urgently need something b) a culture that offers rentable suitcases and c) steady, reliable full-time work with sufficient disposable income so you can afford to rent a suitcase, or buy anything you can't rent, which you will give away or sell (at a large loss) whenever you are done with it. Also being a 35-year-old single man helps.

    But in amongst
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  • Paul A.

    The sections "The 55 tips to help you say goodbye to your things" and "the 15 more tips for the next stage of your minimalist journey" were worth the price of admission.

    The "before" and "after" pictures were a nice touch.

    The only reason I gave it four stars instead of five is because it could have been tighter; the book could have have benefited from a stricter edit. His explanation of what is essentially hedonic adaptation (in the section called "Why do we accumulate so much in the first place?
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  • 7jane

    I've read a couple of books on minimalist lifestyle, and this is one of the best in my opinion. I especially like that all the photos included with the book are at the start, helps to make the book appealing. You can see from them not only single persons, but also a couple, a family and a traveling person's backpack contents (though only scarf can be counted as clothes in it, which leaves me wondering about the rest of the clothes that could be there).

    This includes the author's own pictures and
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  • Ksenia

    I've read this book in Norwegian. The English version is not available just yet, so I chose to read in Norwegian.

    It can be divided in two parts: useful and not useful. Tips are okay and interesting and rewarding to follow. As a minimalist myself, I have already tried a lot of things listed in the book. An author, however, goes to extreme version of minimalistic approach to life, trying to persuade us to come with him. Someone might find it okay, someone might be taken aback.

    To be honest, the w
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  • Amanda NEVER MANDY

    **I received this book for free through Goodreads First Reads.**

    Nothing better than throwing out everything you own to make space for nothing. All you need is a bed that doubles as a couch, one set of dishes to cook and eat off of and one towel to dry said dishes and yourself off with. What an easy-peasy, simplified life.

    ARE YOU FREAKING KIDDING ME?!?!?! ONE TOWEL FOR EVERYTHING?!?!?!

    That was the moment I realized a minimalist lifestyle was not for me. I know the author says to each their own an
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  • Justin Tate

    I’m now a minimalist.

  • Kris

    "For a minimalist, the objective isn't to reduce, it's to eliminate distractions so they can focus on the things that are truly important."

    17. Organizing is not minimizing.

    24. Let go of the idea of getting your money’s worth.

    31. Think of stores as your personal warehouses.

    43. What if you started from scratch?

    34. If you lost it, would you buy it again?

    19. Leave your unused space empty.

    45. Discard anything that creates visual noise.

    +. Question the conventional way you’re supposed to use things.

    +.
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